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Wolfson Children's Hospital Nine Things To Know Before Taking Your Child to the ER

Head, Neck and Skull Base Tumors

Congenital masses, vascular anomalies, and benign (non-cancerous) and malignant (cancerous) tumors of the head, neck and skull base are very rare in children, so they demand a multi-specialty approach. The team at Wolfson Children’s uses sophisticated, modern methods of treatment, using the latest advanced techniques.

Why Wolfson

Wolfson Children’s Hospital has been ranked by U.S. News & World Report as one of the 50 best children’s hospitals for neurology, neurosurgery and cancer care. We are also an Accredited Pediatric Cancer Program by the American College of Surgeons (ACoS). Our team is involved in research and clinical trials, and provide cutting-edge treatment options based on the latest medical advancements.

Conditions We Treat

Benign Tumors

  • Pituitary adenoma
  • Craniopharyngioma
  • Meningioma
  • Chondroma
  • Chordoma
  • Schwannoma
  • Neurofibroma
  • Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma
  • Cervical teratoma
  • Odontogenic tumors
  • Orbital tumors
  • Thyroid and parathyroid adenomas

Vascular Anomalies

  • Hemangioma
  • Arteriovenous malformation
  • Lymphatic malformation

Malignant Tumors

  • Rhabdomyosarcoma
  • Ewing Sarcoma
  • Fibrosarcoma
  • Angiosarcoma
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma
  • Salivary malignancies
  • Paranasal sinus malignancies
  • Thyroid malignancies
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma

Congenital

  • Nasal dermoid
  • Glioma
  • Encephalocele

Head, Neck and Skull Base Tumor Program

Wolfson Children's Hospital provides these services in partnership with Nemours Children's Specialty Care, Jacksonville and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville. Learn more

Head, Neck and Skull Base Tumor Program

University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville Nemours Children's Specialty Care, Jacksonville Wolfson Children’s Hospital

Wolfson Children's Hospital provides these services in partnership with Nemours Children's Specialty Care, Jacksonville and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville. Learn more

Wolfson Children's Hospital High Tech Neurosurgery

High-Tech Skull Base Surgery

Wolfson Children's is a national leader in both minimally invasive and highly complex surgeries. Our state-of-the-art operating rooms are specially equipped to bring MRI to the patient during surgery. Surgeons can use the sophisticated imaging equipment during procedures to precisely guide and verify intricate repairs, all leading to better outcomes.

Treatments We Offer

After we’ve confirmed a condition, the team works together to form a treatment plan specifically for your child. Treatments include medical, surgery (both open and minimally invasive techniques), chemotherapy, proton therapy, and directed radiologic interventional approaches. A variety of anterior skull base tumors can actually be removed through the nose.

Our Team

Bringing together a team of doctors that specialize in different areas of medicine allows us to get the best results for your child. The team works closely together to carefully plan personalized treatments and includes these and others:

  • Neurosurgeons
  • Otolaryngologists (ear, nose, throat)
  • Medical and radiation oncologists
  • Interventional radiologists
  • Plastic surgeons
  • Endocrinologists
  • Ophthalmologists
  • Neuroradiologists
  • Pathologists
  • Social workers

Location

The Head, Neck and Skull Base Tumor program serves children from North Florida, South Georgia and beyond. Wolfson Children’s is located on the south bank of the St. Johns River in downtown Jacksonville and is connected to Nemours Children’s Specialty Care via Kids Walk. Ronald McDonald House is next to Nemours.

Patient Stories

Georgia Brothers Diagnosed With Rare Brain Tumor Three Weeks Apart

Learn how Aaron and Andrew’s dual diagnoses with brain tumors were treated at Wolfson Children’s Hospital.

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A Stroke at 14: When Time Means Everything

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