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Wolfson Children’s Hospital of Jacksonville President Michael D. Aubin, FACHE, named one of Florida Trend magazine’s 500 most influential business leaders in the state

Jacksonville, FL —

This month, Florida Trend magazine editors announced that Wolfson Children’s Hospital of Jacksonville President Michael D. Aubin, FACHE,  was named as one of the Florida 500 – a listing of the state’s most influential executives in different economic sectors throughout the state. The selection of the Florida 500 was a result of an immense, year-long research initiative by the editors of this Florida business publication.

Aubin and the other executives selected for this honor are featured in a special section of Florida Trend, which takes a personal, engaging look at the state’s most influential business leaders.

“Michael Aubin is a visionary healthcare leader who is known statewide and nationally for his steadfast devotion to children,” said Brett McClung, FACHE, president and CEO of Baptist Health. “Being named to the Florida 500 is a fitting tribute to Michael for his continuing and positive impact on the lives of families in our region.”

Selections for the Florida 500 were organized according to categories used by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce:

  • Agriculture
  • Arts & entertainment
  • Education
  • Energy
  • Finance & insurance
  • Hospitality/tourism
  • Information/tech/media
  • Law
  • Life sciences
  • Manufacturing
  • Philanthropy/non-profits
  • Professional services
  • Real estate
  • Retail/wholesale
  • Transportation




Aubin has served as hospital president of Wolfson Children’s Hospital of Jacksonville and senior vice president of Baptist Health since 2011. Prior to his current position, he served as the founding administrator/chief operating officer of St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa. Aubin helped to re-establish St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital in 1990 after a 23-year hiatus.

Prior to his role at St. Joseph’s/BayCare, Mr. Aubin served as founding Associate Administrator of the new H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa.  Mr. Aubin’s early career included serving as a consultant with M. Bostin Associates in New York City and various roles with Milwaukee Children’s Hospital in Wisconsin.

Mr. Aubin is a Fellow in the American College of Healthcare Executives. A longtime child advocate, Mr. Aubin has served as Board President for the Florida Association of Children's Hospitals (FACH) and is a member of its Board of Directors. He currently serves on the national Children's Hospital Association's (CHA) Board of Trustees, and is co-chair of CHA’s Public Policy Committee.

Mr. Aubin also is a JAX USA Partnership Trustee, serves on the Board of Directors of Sulzbacher Center in Jacksonville, the Board of Directors for Northeast Florida Regional STEM2 Hub, and the Board of Directors for the Jacksonville Sports Medicine Program (JSMP) and is a Past Chair. In addition, he currently serves on the Operational Efficiency and Integration Committee of Florida Healthy Kids Corporation.

Mr. Aubin has received numerous recognitions, including the 2018 Child Advocate of the Year by the Northeast Florida Pediatric Society, 2016 Children’s Champion in Health Care from Episcopal Children’s Services, 2015 Award of Merit from Healing Hands Community Advisory Council, and 2014 R. David and I. Lorraine Thomas Child Advocate of the Year by the Jacksonville Florida Children’s Home Society.  For his work in international children's health, Mr. Aubin received the International Humanitarian Award from the Tampa Interbay Rotary Club and Rotary Gift of Life of Florida, Inc., in 2006.

Mr. Aubin holds a master’s degree in Business - Health Services Administration from the University of Wisconsin – Madison. He also is a magna cum laude graduate of Providence College in Providence, Rhode Island, where he received his Bachelor of Science degree in Health Services Administration.

Mr. Aubin is married to Hillary and they have four children and two grandchildren.